BASEGEAR.com

 

 

 

 
Home | Site Index | Shipping | Why Base Gear? | About Us | Help Center | View Cart
Free shipping on orders over $50 (on most U.S. orders) - click here for details
Join our mailing list and receive 20% off your order today!
 
 


FM 21-76 | Appendix G - Clouds: Foretellers of Weather


Before proceeding, please review Important Disclaimers about the information, resources & links contained in this website. The information provided below is for basic reference only and is not intended to be professional instruction.


APPENDIX G - CLOUDS: FORETELLERS OF WEATHER

About 200 years ago an Englishman classified clouds ac cording to what they looked like to a person seeing them from the ground. He grouped them into three classes and gave them Latin names: cirrus, cumulus, and stratus. These three names, alone and combined with other Latin words, are still used to identify different cloud formations.
By being familiar with the different cloud formation and what weather they portend, you can take appropriate action for your protection.

Click here to view photograph

Cirrus clouds


Cirrus clouds are the very high clouds that look like thin streaks or curls. They are usually 6 kilometers or more above the earth and are usually a sign of fair weather. In cold climates, however, cirrus clouds that begin to multiply and are accompanied by increasing winds blowing steadily from a northerly direction indicate an oncoming blizzard.

Click here to view photograph

Cumulus clouds


Cumulus clouds are fluffy, white, heaped-up clouds. These clouds, which are much lower than cirrus clouds, are often fair weather clouds. They are apt to appear around midday on a sunny day, looking like large cotton balls with flat bottoms. As the day advances, they may become bigger and push higher into the atmosphere. Piling up to appear like a mountain of clouds. These can turn into storm clouds.

Click here to view photograph

Stratus clouds


Stratus clouds are very low, gray clouds, often making an even gray layer over the whole sky. These clouds generally mean rain.

Click here to view photograph

Nimbus clouds


Nimbus clouds are ram clouds of uniform grayness that extend over the entire sky

Click here to view photograph

Cumulonimbus clouds


Cumulonimbus is the cloud formation resulting from a cumulus cloud building up, extending to great heights, and forming in the shape of an anvil. You can expect a thunderstorm if this cloud is moving in your direction.

Click here to view photograph

Cirrostratus clouds


Cirrostratus is a fairly uniform layer of high stratus clouds that are darker than cirrus clouds. Cirrostratus clouds indicate good weather.

Click here to view photograph

Cirrocumulus clouds


Cirrocumulus is a small, white, round cloud at a high altitude. Cirrocumulus clouds indicate good weather.

Click here to view photograph

Scuds


A loose, vapory cloud (scud) driven before the wind is a sign of continuing bad weather.



 

 Contact Us | Site Index | About Base Gear | View Cart | Help Center
Returns |
Groups & Government | International Orders | Shipping
 Privacy & Security | � 2017 Base Gear LLC | Legal Disclaimers

 
 
100% Secure - 128-bit SSL Encryption. We accept VISA, MasterCard, American Express, Discover and PayPal.